John A. Logan College celebrates its 35,000th graduate

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CARTERVILLE — On June 13, 1970, 53 people graduated from John A. Logan College.

It was the College’s first graduation after it was established in 1967. To add perspective, that date was also the last time the Beatle’s would have a song reach No. 1, “The Long and Winding Road.”

Comparatively, the college, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, has had a long and winding road of success, culminating with its 35,000th graduate this past December.

That person was Emily Jack, a 2013 graduate of Marion High School.

“To imagine that 35,000 people have obtained diplomas and certificates from John A. Logan College and that those people have gone on to use their education to better their lives is an astounding thought,” said Tim Williams, dean of Student Services at John A. Logan College. “By being the 35,000th person to graduate from the College, Emily is a great representative of what the College can do for someone’s life.”

Eighteen months earlier, Jack had enrolled in the Cardiac Sonography Program at John A. Logan College. As she stepped onto the College’s campus, she had no idea where her education was about to take her. This week, she began working at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, which is ranked among the nation’s best hospitals by U.S. News & World Report.

“You can’t imagine how excited I am to be working at one of the best hospitals in America,” Jack said. “I’m very proud to be here, to be hired to work at a hospital that provides world-class care.”

Jack praised Valerie Newberry, coordinator and instructor of the College’s Cardiac Sonography Program, for her teaching skills and encouragement.

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“She’s outstanding,” Jack said of Newberry. “I had a great experience at Logan.”

Said Jack, “I would recommend John A. Logan College to anyone. I think it is a really, really great school.”

The Diagnostic Cardiac Sonography Program is a full-time career program that addresses the growing demand for highly trained, well-educated sonographers. The sonographer utilizes high frequency sound waves to produce visual images of the body. Echocardiography evaluates the anatomy and hemodynamics of the heart, its valves, and related blood vessels. The professional level of this health care service requires highly skilled and competent individuals who function as integral members of the health care team.

In order to graduate the program, the sonographer must be able to produce and evaluate ultrasound images and related data that are used by physicians to render a medical diagnosis. Diagnostic sonography serves a diverse population in a variety of settings such as hospitals, clinics, and veterinary offices. The goal of sonography is to produce the best diagnostic information possible with available resources. The curriculum is an extremely active one in which the student is responsible for maintaining academic requirements on campus, as well as participating in an internship at clinical affiliates. A strong math and physics background is suggested. The program’s primary goal is to prepare competent entry-level cardiac sonographers in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills) and affective (behavior) learning domains.

“Providing high-quality education that allows our graduates to go on and be successful anywhere they choose to go is what makes me proudest as dean of students at John A. Logan College,” Williams said. “The fact that this institution has been doing that for 50 years and has helped the lives of 35,000 people should be a sense of pride to anyone who has ever been a part of this College.”

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John A. Logan College celebrates its 35,000th graduate

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