MAP Grant Funding Gets A Boost

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The new state budget will fund Illinois colleges and universities at the level of funding they received in 2015 … minus 10 percent. But there’s one area of higher education that got a boost.

The Monetary Award Program, known as MAP, provides grants of up to 47-hundred dollars to low-income college students. The two-year budget impasse shone a bright light on the program, as these students spoke out about how the lack of funding threw their lives into chaos. Lawmakers responded by increasing the amount going to MAP scholarships by 10 percent in the new state budget.

 

“This was good. I applaud the general assembly for passing this budget with respect to MAP.”

 

Tom Cross, who led House Republicans for more than a decade, now chairs the state board of higher education. Even this increase, he says, isn’t enough.

 

“We could — in terms of the need to take care of all the kids eligible for MAP — we actually need more money.” 

 

He says he hopes this renewed commitment to MAP funding will persuade students to stay in Illinois.

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July 19, 2017 at 03:40AM

MAP Grant Funding Gets A Boost

MAP Grant Funding Gets A Boost

http://ift.tt/2tp6Erk

The new state budget will fund Illinois colleges and universities at the level of funding they received in 2015 … minus 10 percent. But there’s one area of higher education that got a boost.

The Monetary Award Program, known as MAP, provides grants of up to 47-hundred dollars to low-income college students. The two-year budget impasse shone a bright light on the program, as these students spoke out about how the lack of funding threw their lives into chaos. Lawmakers responded by increasing the amount going to MAP scholarships by 10 percent in the new state budget.

 

“This was good. I applaud the general assembly for passing this budget with respect to MAP.”

 

Tom Cross, who led House Republicans for more than a decade, now chairs the state board of higher education. Even this increase, he says, isn’t enough.

 

“We could — in terms of the need to take care of all the kids eligible for MAP — we actually need more money.” 

 

He says he hopes this renewed commitment to MAP funding will persuade students to stay in Illinois.

01-All No Sub,02-Pol,03-HL 20,04-Pens 2,12-Coll,16-Econ,HE Blog,HE Coalition

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July 19, 2017 at 03:40AM

MAP Grant Funding Gets A Boost

MAP Grant Funding Gets A Boost

http://ift.tt/2tp6Erk

The new state budget will fund Illinois colleges and universities at the level of funding they received in 2015 … minus 10 percent. But there’s one area of higher education that got a boost.

The Monetary Award Program, known as MAP, provides grants of up to 47-hundred dollars to low-income college students. The two-year budget impasse shone a bright light on the program, as these students spoke out about how the lack of funding threw their lives into chaos. Lawmakers responded by increasing the amount going to MAP scholarships by 10 percent in the new state budget.

 

“This was good. I applaud the general assembly for passing this budget with respect to MAP.”

 

Tom Cross, who led House Republicans for more than a decade, now chairs the state board of higher education. Even this increase, he says, isn’t enough.

 

“We could — in terms of the need to take care of all the kids eligible for MAP — we actually need more money.” 

 

He says he hopes this renewed commitment to MAP funding will persuade students to stay in Illinois.

01-All No Sub,02-Pol,03-HL 20,04-Pens 2,12-Coll,16-Econ,HE Blog,HE Coalition

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via Local http://news.wsiu.org

July 19, 2017 at 03:40AM

MAP Grant Funding Gets A Boost

MAP Grant Funding Gets A Boost

http://ift.tt/2tp6Erk

The new state budget will fund Illinois colleges and universities at the level of funding they received in 2015 … minus 10 percent. But there’s one area of higher education that got a boost.

The Monetary Award Program, known as MAP, provides grants of up to 47-hundred dollars to low-income college students. The two-year budget impasse shone a bright light on the program, as these students spoke out about how the lack of funding threw their lives into chaos. Lawmakers responded by increasing the amount going to MAP scholarships by 10 percent in the new state budget.

 

“This was good. I applaud the general assembly for passing this budget with respect to MAP.”

 

Tom Cross, who led House Republicans for more than a decade, now chairs the state board of higher education. Even this increase, he says, isn’t enough.

 

“We could — in terms of the need to take care of all the kids eligible for MAP — we actually need more money.” 

 

He says he hopes this renewed commitment to MAP funding will persuade students to stay in Illinois.

01-All No Sub,02-Pol,03-HL 20,04-Pens 2,12-Coll,16-Econ,HE Blog,HE Coalition

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July 19, 2017 at 03:40AM

MAP Grant Funding Gets A Boost

MAP grant funding returns to Illinois

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Though students at the University of Illinois in Springfield still received funding because UIS fronted that cost for students, that was only a short-term fix. (WICS)

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (WICS) — 

With a full state budget now in place, many state programs, higher education institutions, and social services are slowly starting to see state funds. Universities were among the hardest hit by the budget crisis. Most were forced to make budget cuts, drop programs, and some faced losing accreditation.

During the impasse, Illinois stopped funding MAP grants, which provide assistance to thousands of the state’s neediest students for college, but that funding is back and students throughout Illinois are relieved. Though students at the University of Illinois in Springfield still received funding because UIS fronted that cost for students, that was only a short-term fix.

“Affordability is always an issue,” UIS Chancellor Susan Koch said. “Every year we have students who struggle paying for college.”

Roughly 800 students at UIS rely on map grants; that’s about $2.5 million each academic year. That’s a hefty burden shouldered by UIS when that funding was eliminated due to budget uncertainty despite being owed millions of dollars by the state.

“We fronted the MAP money for several years to make sure that regardless of what the state does, our students will be able to attend school,” Chancellor Koch said.

At UIS, an individual student receives, on average, over $3,000 per year from MAP grants. With the rising cost of education, any at-risk funding creates a stressful situation for students.

“That stability was starting to fade,” said Navi Fields, a junior at UIS. “I was starting to pay more and I was starting to put more pressure on myself as far as having to pay because I didn’t want to put it all on my mom, so I was starting to stress.”

UIS says they’ve been fronting MAP grant funding for three years and would have done so for as long as possible. Still, when the budget was finally passed administration and students say there was a collective sigh of relief.

“It’s just a sense of stability,” said Danielle Woodson, a sophomore at UIS. “It’s nice knowing that you don’t have to worry about coming up with the extra money especially for low-income families.”

The state is paying for this year and last year’s map grant funding and all previous years have been back paid.

MAP grant funding returns to Illinois

New board chairman for City Colleges

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The changing of the guard at the City Colleges of Chicago continued Tuesday with the appointment of a new board chairman.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel appointed Walter E. Massey, chancellor of the School of the Art Institute, to serve as City Colleges board chairman and form a team with newly-appointed Chancellor Juan Salgado.

Massey replaces Dr. Charles Middleton, the retired Roosevelt University president whose two-year term as board chairman has expired.

The appointment was announced by press release while Emanuel is in Europe promoting Chicago business in general and technology companies in particular.

The release touted Massey as a “distinguished educator and scientist” with more than 50 years of experience in leading “some of the nation’s most prominent higher education and scientific institutions.”

“I am grateful for Dr. Middleton’s service in helping to implement the reinvention efforts that resulted in a significant increase in the graduation rate and job placement for our students,” said Emanuel.

“Walter Massey’s extensive track record developing young minds, strengthening community ties and creating unique institutional partnerships across the city make him the ideal candidate to support Chancellor Juan Salgado’s efforts to ensure City Colleges students complete their education and succeed in 21st century careers.”

According to City Hall, Massey’s seven-year tenure at the School of the Art Institute has been focused on increasing student scholarships, diversifying the student body and broadening the school’s partnerships across the arts, higher education and business communities.

He was credited with helping to launch launch the school’s “first-ever major fundraising campaign, Beautiful/Work: The Campaign for SAIC, which has now raised more than $46 million toward its goal of $50 million by June 30, 2018. Massey was appointed to the position of chancellor in 2015.

In March, Emanuel chose Salgado, a prominent Hispanic community leader, to be the new $250,000-a-year City Colleges chancellor under pressure to appoint more Hispanics to leadership positions.

“I am convinced and the board is convinced that I am the person this institution needs at this moment in time. I’m going to be an amazing candidate across the city,” Salgado, CEO of Instituto del Progreso, said then.

Salgado replaced Cheryl Hyman, who announced last June that her tumultuous six-year tenure would end after a one-year transition that gave the seven-member board time to conduct a nationwide search for her replacement.

In announcing Salgado’s appointment, Emanuel established an ambitious goal for his new City Colleges chancellor to achieve: a 25 percent graduation rate by 2019 in a system that graduated just 7 percent of its students when he took office.

The mayor’s goal, if Salgado can reach it, would be a nearly 50 percent improvement from the current graduation rate of 17 percent. But it won’t be the only performance measure by which the boss judges his new, chancellor.

Now, Salgado has a new partner in that effort.

Salgado has already appointed all-purpose mayoral troubleshooter Felicia Davis, who once ran the Public Building Commission, to serve as president of Olive-Harvey College, in part to help jump-start the twice-stalled construction of a $45 million transportation, distribution and logistics center.

The new chancellor has also announced plans to sell City Colleges’ downtown headquarters and establish “teams focused on enhancing the student experience and bolstering student enrollment as well as strategic outreach to addressed the funding crisis” at City Colleges.

He charged that City Colleges has been “shortchanged by $70 million over the last two years” by the state’s failure to “fund student MAP grants this year after significantly delaying them last year.”

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July 18, 2017 at 05:28PM

New board chairman for City Colleges

With state budget in place, Michael ready for future of EIU athletics

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CHARLESTON (WCIA) — Eastern Illinois University was one of the hardest hit by the state’s 700-plus day budget impasse. Several cuts had to me made, including in the athletic department. Now with a budget in place, Eastern athletic director Tom Michael has a brighter outlook on the days ahead.

EIU athletic director Tom Michael can look at the future of Panther athletics with a sharper focus nowadays.

“There’s a level of relief to say that they’ve gotten that piece of it figured out for all of higher education in the state of Illinois but specifically here at EIU,” Michael said. “The important piece there is now we have an opportunity to plan.”

And that’s something Michael has had to do a lot of the last few years. When he was hired back in 2014, Eastern’s athletic department was nearly a million bucks in the red. He balanced the budget in 2016, making up 986-thousand dollars. This year the Panthers will almost break even.

“We’re going to come awfully close to balancing it. It’s something that we’re awfully proud of with the financial circumstances that have been around the state of Illinois and around our institution,” Michael explained. “To be able to fiscally responsible as a department and a unit during these tough times is a credit to our staff and our coaches.”

Unlike Illinois and other Power 5 conference schools that receive big pay days from TV revenue to help them remain independent, Eastern’s athletic budget relies on the state to help make ends meet.  This year about 10 percent of EIU’s 11 million dollar budget will come from state appropriations.  Compare that to the U of I which will receive more than 40 million dollars from the Big Ten alone.

“The institution funds us at a pretty significant number which we certainly could not make it happen without that support,” he added.

And with a budget in place, Michael can focus on supporting his coaches and players this season, instead of worrying about what’s happening in Springfield.

With state budget in place, Michael ready for future of EIU athletics