U of I Considers Tuition Freeze

http://ift.tt/2B1ZZ50





A pair of Republicans at the Illinois statehouse say the University of Illinois may be getting part of the message about the high cost of a college education at their flagship campus. 

The university is looking to freeze tuition, once again, for Illinois students next fall. It’d be the fourth straight tuition freeze, according to university officials. 

And it is perhaps a sign that the U of I is starting to get it, according to state Sen. Dale Righter, R-Mattoon. He’s one of two statehouse Republicans who say the state’s biggest university is finally acknowledging that it’s too expensive for too many Illinois families. 

“This state has lost thousands of students over the last several years to schools outside of Illinois,” Righter said. “Because we have not taken more aggressive action and leaned on institutions of higher learning.”

Click here for summary

Righter said the pendulum is now swinging back on many campuses across the state as school leaders refocus on affordability. 

State Rep. Dan Brady, R-Normal, said he too gets a sense that the mindset at the U of I is changing, though he said $35,000 a year for tuition, room, board, books, and fees is still expensive. 

And Brady said he is still concerned that Illinois students might not always have a place at the University of Illinois.

“You look at that out-of0state and international freshman will increase 1.6 percent this fall,” Brady said. “[The U of I] has to make that tuition freeze up somewhere. And then you have to look at fees.”

University spokesman Tom Hardy said fees will go up, but added that it is too soon to tell how many more out-of-state or foreign students will arrive on campus. 

Hardy did say that the tuition freeze is an acknowledgement of the high cost of a U of I degree. 

“The four years of tuition freezes for in-state freshmen … is a recognition that the affordability of a world-class college education is foremost on the minds of prospective students and their families,” Hardy said in an email. “The state of Illinois is exporting too many high school graduates to out-of-state colleges, and we want to incentivize more of them to attend college here and build their futures in Illinois.”

Righter said it is great that the U of I is looking to freeze tuition. But he said university spending on professors and administrators is still massive, and the school’s pension costs are not being addressed. 

“There is no doubt that pension issues and administrative bloat have to be dealt with. And they will be dealt with, one way or another,” Righter said. “The leaders at the U of I have been able to boast and recruit … in part because of the attractive salaries and pensions benefits that they offer.”

Righter said he thinks Illinois can control costs at the U of I and still preserve the school as a world class university. 

University trustees are scheduled to discuss the tuition freeze at their meeting on Jan. 18 at the Chicago campus. 

(Copyright WBGZ Radio / http://ift.tt/19rx5wC)


01-All No Sub,02-Pol,12-Coll,16-Econ,HE 2 Coalition,HE Blog

Feeds,Southern,Metro East

via Alton Daily News News http://ift.tt/1eKjgbR

January 15, 2018 at 12:06AM

Advertisements
U of I Considers Tuition Freeze

Chicago Is Now Better Educated Than Its Suburbs

http://ift.tt/2FjkD45








The other day Crain’s Greg Hinz noted a couple remarkable things about the city: ”for the first time ever, a majority of jobs in Chicago as a whole were located in the central area of the city,” and the percentage of adults 25 and up with at least a bachelor’s degree is the highest of the five largest cities in America. You can extend that out a bit farther: According to the Chicago Fed’s Midwest Economy blog, it’s actually the highest of the seven largest cities, just edging out New York City and more than five percentage points higher than the third-place city, Los Angeles.


Put the two together and you get this, following a twenty percent gain in college graduates in the city from 2010-2016:



The Midwest Economy blog gets a little deeper into just how the dynamics of Chicago’s college graduates break down. Long story short: the percentage of white residents with a college degree is very high compared to other cities; the percentage of African-Americans and Latinos with a college degree is not nearly as impressive.


I was curious how that inequality compares to a larger group. Any cutoff is going to be somewhat arbitrary, so I went with the 15 largest cities. Chicago still ranks very highly when it comes to white residents with at least a bachelor’s degree (second).



Looking at black residents, the city doesn’t fare as well (ninth).



Same with Latino residents (eighth).



The city that fares best across the board is Austin, in which at least 25 percent of each group has a bachelor’s degree. Since it’s the 11th-largest city in America, it doesn’t factor into the comparisons by Crain’s and the Chicago Fed, but it’s growing very, very fast, as cities lock in the gains from the return to cities.








Share


Edit Module










Edit Module



01-All No Sub,02-Pol,03-HL 20,04-Pens 20,12-Coll,09-ILSN,19-Legal,XHLSN 3,HE 2 Coalition,HE Blog

Feeds

via Chicago magazine http://ift.tt/1lhuPaQ

January 9, 2018 at 02:35PM

Chicago Is Now Better Educated Than Its Suburbs

Chicago Is Now Better Educated Than Its Suburbs

http://ift.tt/2FjkD45








The other day Crain’s Greg Hinz noted a couple remarkable things about the city: ”for the first time ever, a majority of jobs in Chicago as a whole were located in the central area of the city,” and the percentage of adults 25 and up with at least a bachelor’s degree is the highest of the five largest cities in America. You can extend that out a bit farther: According to the Chicago Fed’s Midwest Economy blog, it’s actually the highest of the seven largest cities, just edging out New York City and more than five percentage points higher than the third-place city, Los Angeles.


Put the two together and you get this, following a twenty percent gain in college graduates in the city from 2010-2016:



The Midwest Economy blog gets a little deeper into just how the dynamics of Chicago’s college graduates break down. Long story short: the percentage of white residents with a college degree is very high compared to other cities; the percentage of African-Americans and Latinos with a college degree is not nearly as impressive.


I was curious how that inequality compares to a larger group. Any cutoff is going to be somewhat arbitrary, so I went with the 15 largest cities. Chicago still ranks very highly when it comes to white residents with at least a bachelor’s degree (second).



Looking at black residents, the city doesn’t fare as well (ninth).



Same with Latino residents (eighth).



The city that fares best across the board is Austin, in which at least 25 percent of each group has a bachelor’s degree. Since it’s the 11th-largest city in America, it doesn’t factor into the comparisons by Crain’s and the Chicago Fed, but it’s growing very, very fast, as cities lock in the gains from the return to cities.








Share


Edit Module










Edit Module



01-All No Sub,02-Pol,03-HL 20,04-Pens 20,12-Coll,09-ILSN,19-Legal,XHLSN 3,HE 2 Coalition,HE Blog

Feeds

via Chicago magazine http://ift.tt/1lhuPaQ

January 9, 2018 at 02:35PM

Chicago Is Now Better Educated Than Its Suburbs

Chicago Is Now Better Educated Than Its Suburbs

http://ift.tt/2FjkD45








The other day Crain’s Greg Hinz noted a couple remarkable things about the city: ”for the first time ever, a majority of jobs in Chicago as a whole were located in the central area of the city,” and the percentage of adults 25 and up with at least a bachelor’s degree is the highest of the five largest cities in America. You can extend that out a bit farther: According to the Chicago Fed’s Midwest Economy blog, it’s actually the highest of the seven largest cities, just edging out New York City and more than five percentage points higher than the third-place city, Los Angeles.


Put the two together and you get this, following a twenty percent gain in college graduates in the city from 2010-2016:



The Midwest Economy blog gets a little deeper into just how the dynamics of Chicago’s college graduates break down. Long story short: the percentage of white residents with a college degree is very high compared to other cities; the percentage of African-Americans and Latinos with a college degree is not nearly as impressive.


I was curious how that inequality compares to a larger group. Any cutoff is going to be somewhat arbitrary, so I went with the 15 largest cities. Chicago still ranks very highly when it comes to white residents with at least a bachelor’s degree (second).



Looking at black residents, the city doesn’t fare as well (ninth).



Same with Latino residents (eighth).



The city that fares best across the board is Austin, in which at least 25 percent of each group has a bachelor’s degree. Since it’s the 11th-largest city in America, it doesn’t factor into the comparisons by Crain’s and the Chicago Fed, but it’s growing very, very fast, as cities lock in the gains from the return to cities.








Share


Edit Module










Edit Module



01-All No Sub,02-Pol,03-HL 20,04-Pens 20,12-Coll,09-ILSN,19-Legal,XHLSN 3,HE 2 Coalition,HE Blog

Feeds

via Chicago magazine http://ift.tt/1lhuPaQ

January 9, 2018 at 02:35PM

Chicago Is Now Better Educated Than Its Suburbs

Illinois Higher Ed Enrollment Continues to Decline

http://ift.tt/2CR454V

Enrollment in colleges and universities continued to decline across the state last year, according to figures released by the Illinois Board of Higher Education. Overall, undergraduate enrollment decreased by 2 percent, with even steeper drops at public universities and community colleges. Schools defying this trend include those focused on medical professions, such as City Colleges of Chicago’s Malcolm X campus. Mark Potter, the provost, says its home in the medical district makes it more attractive. "Being a Center of Excellence means that students are going to come in order to pursue their healthcare interests. But it also means that we’re able to focus on building partnerships at that location to benefit those students." Potter says. Graduate enrollment ticked up, but only by a fraction of a percent overall.​

01-All No Sub,02-Pol,03-HL 20,04-Pens 20,12-Coll,16-Econ,HE 2 Coalition,HE Blog

Feeds

via http://ift.tt/1iyQQ5A

January 8, 2018 at 06:34AM

Illinois Higher Ed Enrollment Continues to Decline

Growing number of states foot the bill for community college

http://ift.tt/2CDrK5P

WASHINGTON – To churn out more workers with marketable skills, an increasing number of states are offering residents free tuition to community colleges and technical schools.

The move also is a reaction to fast-rising tuition costs – increases that stem, in part, from states reducing their financial support of public colleges and universities.

Morley Winograd, president of the Campaign for Free College Tuition, a Seattle-based nonprofit, described the movement as “the fastest-growing policy idea in the country” – one with bipartisan support.

“Everybody’s got cheap dirt – but do you have skilled workers?” Winograd said. “That’s the question states face as they recruit new industry.”

But the free tuition push hasn’t produced an economic bonanza for any of the pioneering cities – at least not yet – and some states have struggled to come up with the money to keep their end of the bargain.

The free tuition trend began in 2005 in Kalamazoo, Michigan, which launched a privately funded effort to combat its economic decline. The movement has quickly spread: Today roughly 200 localities offer young residents free tuition to local community colleges and technical schools.

In the past two years, 12 states have enacted legislation to join them. The state rush to offer free tuition began with Tennessee in 2015, but other states quickly followed. Arkansas, Hawaii, Indiana, Kentucky, Minnesota, New York, Oregon and Rhode Island have started programs, and Nevada plans to launch one this year. California and Montana last year enacted legislation to create programs but have yet to appropriate funds.

Delaware and Louisiana also offer somewhat more restrictive free college scholarships with additional requirements, such as a minimum college aptitude test score or a clean record.

Free tuition plans typically promise students a free ride if they meet certain requirements, such as maintaining a certain GPA. Most plans only pay for tuition, so students must cover fees, books and other costs.

Most of the programs are “last dollar,” which means a student must obtain and use federal aid, such as Pell Grants or other scholarships, before the program kicks in to cover the rest.

Some states, such as Arkansas and Kentucky, limit their programs to students in selected fields. Arkansas only awards grants to students focusing on science, technology, engineering, math and other subjects employers most value. This year, Work Ready Kentucky is limiting aid to students studying health care, transportation and logistics, advanced manufacturing, construction, and business services and information technology.

“Clearly we’re seeing a lot of momentum right now,” said Dustin Weeden, senior policy analyst with the State Higher Education Executive Officers Association, an advocacy group based in Boulder, Colorado.

Tennessee’s stated goal is to make sure that 55 percent of Tennesseans have a college degree or certificate by 2025. The state started by offering free tuition for two years of community college or technical school to every recent high school graduate in the state. The state in 2016 revised the program to allow a greater number of older adults to attend any of the 27 Tennessee Colleges of Applied Technology for free, starting in this coming fall.

The state pays for the programs through an endowment started with $300 million in excess lottery revenue. The program operates on interest from the endowment.

Tuition at four-year public colleges has risen 35 percent since the 2008 school year, according to an analysis by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a left-leaning think tank based in Washington. In Tennessee, per-student state funding at public colleges and universities declined 18 percent from 2008 to 2016, and the average annual tuition at public colleges and universities rose by more than $3,000 during that period.

Since Tennessee launched its free tuition program, applications and enrollment at the state’s community colleges have soared. More than 33,000 Tennesseans have attended college free. Higher education is now a part of Tennessee’s sales pitch to potential employers, said Mike Krause, executive director of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission.

“I can absolutely tell you it figures in our conversations,” he said. Although he could not point to a specific employer won by free college, Krause said: “There’s a buzz now about education that wasn’t there before.”

But in Kalamazoo, a dozen years of free tuition have yielded mixed results.

Kalamazoo Promise, which is funded by anonymous donors, covers four years of tuition at any public college or university in Michigan or at 15 private colleges in the state. Students who attend Kalamazoo schools every year from kindergarten through 12th grade receive all tuition and fees paid; those who attend grades nine through 12 receive 65 percent of their costs paid.

Tim Ready, a sociology professor and director of the Walker Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnic Relations at Western Michigan University, said the first nine years of free tuition, which cost donors $54 million, was “marginally beneficial but not a slam dunk” for Kalamazoo’s economy.

“We had the Great Recession, which makes it hard to determine what the effect of Kalamazoo Promise on the economy has been,” Ready said. Other factors, such as a new university medical school, have played a role in the slowly recovering economy, he said.

Ready believes that free tuition is “necessary but not sufficient” to create economic impact. Between 2005 and 2014, the city’s public school enrollment grew by almost 25 percent (though the number of low-income kids receiving free lunches also increased). Kalamazoo now has more college graduates, and the erosion in its population has stopped.

“Kalamazoo Promise probably did help mitigate the decline in the central city area,” Ready said.

But he cautioned that the progress “is not reaching everybody. There’s a lot of income inequality here.”

(EDITORS: STORY CAN END HERE)

In Oregon, which also offers each participating student $1,000 for books and other expenses, the challenge has been finding money to keep the program going.

Oregon Promise, established by the Legislature in 2015, scrambled after its first year, 2016-17, when lawmakers, while increasing funding, appropriated less than needed to continue the program in its original form. Demand had risen more than expected.

The Legislature increased funding from $10 million in the start-up year to $40 million in the next two-year budget, but that was still $8 million short. To compensate, the state set stricter income eligibility limits for new students (current students were grandfathered in).

“That word – promise – is what makes the program really galvanizing,” said Ben Cannon, executive director of the Oregon Higher Education Coordinating Commission.

“States should be very careful about making promises they may not be able to keep,” he said. “When the program has to compete every year or every other year with other worthy needs in the state budget, legislators can find other priorities more compelling.”

–––

©2018 Stateline.org

Visit Stateline.org at http://www.stateline.org

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

01-All No Sub,02-Pol,12-Coll,16-Econ,HE 2 Coalition,HE Blog

Feeds,SV

via SaukValley.com http://ift.tt/102UFVC

January 7, 2018 at 10:42PM

Growing number of states foot the bill for community college

U. of I. plans in-state tuition freeze for 4th straight year

http://ift.tt/2CUbiPs

Hoping to stem an exodus of local students to colleges in other states, the University of Illinois plans to freeze its base tuition for incoming, in-state freshmen for a fourth consecutive year, the Tribune has learned.

University President Timothy Killeen will recommend extending the tuition freeze for Illinois residents who enroll this fall, he told the Tribune in an interview Thursday. The board of trustees is scheduled to vote on Killeen’s proposal at its meeting on Jan. 18.

The fixed tuition means Illinois residents starting this fall will pay the same base rates as in-state students who enrolled every year since 2014: $12,036 a year at Urbana-Champaign, $10,584 at Chicago and $9,405 in Springfield. The total price of attendance is significantly higher after incorporating required fees, as well as room and board. Those costs will increase for many students next year. Students in popular programs such as engineering will continue to pay higher tuition, as well.

The move to keep a lid on base tuition for residents comes as Illinois public universities face increasing competition from public universities in neighboring states.

On the heels of a bruising two-year budget impasse that starved the state’s public universities of aid, all but two state public schools — U. of I. at Urbana-Champaign and University of Illinois at Chicago — recorded enrollment drops in the fall. At the same time, state Illinoisans are leaving the state in droves, chiefly for other Midwestern public and private schools with comparable rates, generous financial aid and better overall stability in higher education, state education data show.

In 2002, 71 percent of Illinois high school graduates who attended four-year universities chose in-state schools, according to the Illinois Board of Higher Education. By 2015, the most recent year data were available, just 55 percent chose Illinois colleges.

If the board approves the proposal, it would mark the first time the university locked tuition rates for four straight years since 1974 to 1977.

“We do know that the financial aspects of decision-making for Illinois families are very important,” Killeen said. “We’re committed to quality of product, excellence and affordability.”

Board Chairman Timothy Koritz expressed support for the idea, noting the long trend of skyrocketing tuition when he joined the board in 2009.

“We grew very concerned about basically pricing certain constituents out of business and making it less affordable to attend University of Illinois for middle-class families,” Koritz said. “As a land-grant institution, it’s our responsibility to make higher education affordable to as many people in the state as possible.”

Several categories of mandatory fees, room and board, and tuition rates for out-of-state and international students would increase under Killeen’s proposal. State law requires tuition for freshman students to stay constant for four years, though schools can increase other costs.

Fees at Urbana-Champaign would increase by $20 to $3,058 per year. Non-resident and international student tuition would increase 1.6 percent. Room and board would remain the same.

Killeen’s recommendation would also include for the first time a per-semester increase for international students in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences. Those students would add $750 to their tuition each term starting in the fall.

Killeen said money generated from that would go toward supporting programs and scholarships benefiting first-generation, underrepresented and need-based Illinois students.

Fees at the Chicago campus would rise $14, to $3,146 a year. Base tuition would increase 1.4 percent to1.5 percent for out-of-state students and 1.6 percent for international students. Standard room and board charges would increase 1 percent, to $11,070 per year.

Annual fees at the Springfield campus would increase $200, to $2,426, starting in the spring. The change incorporates a student-approved charge to help pay for a new student union. Tuition rates for non-resident freshman students and the price for the standard housing and meal plan would not change.

Killeen said the university is committed to stabilizing tuition despite some growing financial pressures. The state’s inability to pass a budget for two years means the three-school system went without $467 million from the state that it otherwise would have received.

“It’s not been easy,” Killeen said. “We would like to continue this effort into the future. It does depend to a significant extent upon sustained and reliable support from the state.”

Officials said they believed that locking tuition costs has helped maintain, and even increase, in-state enrollment in recent years.

Undergraduate Illinoisans now total 44,907 on the three campuses as of this fall, according to the data, a 5.2 percent increase since the base tuition freeze was implemented.

But it has been an uphill battle.

U. of I. officials acknowledged in the fall that they admitted hundreds more Illinois students compared to the year before. Many students, though, chose to attend college elsewhere.

“When we survey students that we’ve admitted, the top reasons they give us for not coming to University of Illinois are financial barriers,” said Barbara Wilson, vice president for academic affairs. “We are working hard to contain costs and reduce the barriers that keep students from enrolling at one of our great schools.”

Illinois is not the only state grappling with changing demographics.

The number of high school graduates throughout the Midwestern region is declining and is expected to continue dropping for the next several years, according to recent demographic studies.

Nearly 224,000 fewer undergraduates enrolled at U.S. universities last fall, according to a December analysis from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. Illinois had the third-largest enrollment decrease of any state, shrinking by 18,198 students in the fall. Of the 10 states with the largest drops, seven are in the Midwest.

There are lofty, self-imposed standards, as well. Despite dwindling state support and fewer students in the college pipeline, the three-school University of Illinois system is aiming grow enrollment 15 percent across the three schools by 2021.

“I think it’s really important to the future of the state of Illinois that we keep our best and brightest in the state,” Koritz said. “These highly intelligent children of ours that go out of state to get their education, many of them never return. The university wants to be a big part in trying to reverse that trend.”

drhodes@chicagotribune.com

@rhodes_dawn

01-All No Sub,02-Pol,03-HL 20,04-Pens 20,12-Coll,13-GBI,16-Econ,HE Blog,HE 2 Coalition

Feeds,Chi Trib

via Breaking News – Chicago Tribune http://ift.tt/1LjWE0R

January 4, 2018 at 06:27PM

U. of I. plans in-state tuition freeze for 4th straight year