Newsradio WJPF interview with Randy Dunn

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Newsradio WJPF interview with Randy Dunn

SIU President Randy Dunn joins The Morning Newswatch.

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April 19, 2018 at 09:29AM

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Newsradio WJPF interview with Randy Dunn

Big win for the Courier at this year’s ICCJA

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Vandy Manyeh, News Editor

The Courier Newspaper is the best “Division 1” community college newspaper in Illinois.

The publication won the first place in general excellence award for excellent reporting and the overall quality of the newspaper at the Illinois Community College Journalism Association (ICCJA) conference in Springfield, Ill. on April 6.

The publication also won first place awards in every major newspaper category and 21 awards in total.

“It’s an honor to be considered for so many awards, and to do so well this year is unbelievably humbling,” Editor-In-Chief Carlos Peterson said.

In features, Caroline Broderick, the Courier’s former features editor, won first place in features writing. Broderick won the award for her concise and in-depth coverage about happenings at a medical marijuana dispensary in Illinois. Broderick is a journalism major at Emerson College in Boston.

Former E-I-C Lucas Kaprowski won first place for arts review. Kaprowski studies english literature at Northern Illinois University.

The Courier was also rewarded for its excellence in visual journalism. Former Graphics Editor Joseph Molino won first place for page design in the “Division 1” category. Molino and Olivia DeBock, the Courier’s current graphics editor, won second place in the open category for front page design for their “mind games” illustration about mental health on campus.

Photo Editor Hannah Davis won first place for sports photo and honorable mention for a features photo.

In the editorial category, Opinion Editor Kimberly Wilson won the editorial writer of the year award. The Courier also brought home the staff editorial writer of the year award.

In sports, Peterson’s column about the Wheaton College hazing scandal earned him sports column of the year recognition. Prior to becoming editor-in-chief, Peterson was the Courier’s sports editor. He is headed to the University of Kansas this fall to study broadcast journalism.

In the news category, News Editor Vandy Manyeh won the news story of the year award for his story titled: “Big jump in the number of students seeking personal counseling at COD.” Manyeh also won first place news story (open), and the reporter of the year awards.

Former News Editor Kitt Fresa won first place for news photo. Fresa studies journalism at Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, and works as the features editor for the Daily Egyptian.

At this year’s ICCJA spring conference, Charlie Wheeler, director of the Public Affairs Reporting program at the University of Illinois-Springfield, served as the keynote speaker.

Wheeler shared his experiences with student journalists about covering state government. The veteran statehouse reporter has almost 50 years of experience covering news. He is best known for a distinguished career at the Chicago Sun-Times.

“We are the eyes and ears of the public; we are the watchdog,” Wheeler said to student journalists.

The conference covered major topics about campus reporting and standards. Other speakers included: Maureen McKinney, NPR Illinois news editor and lead editor of Illinois issues, and Jason Koch, news, social media and search editor for Belleville News-Democrat.

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April 10, 2018 at 03:55PM

Big win for the Courier at this year’s ICCJA

Elmhurst College students unofficially break talk show world record

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ELMHURST – Jen Anthony and Emma Kaminski, both seniors at Elmhurst College, have unofficially broken a world record for the longest radio talk show broadcast hosted by a team.

Both students have been working for the radio station, WRSE, throughout college, with Anthony starting as a disc jockey as a freshman and Kaminski starting as a sophomore as the business and underwriting director.

Kaminski and Anthony had never hosted a show together or been guests on each other’s shows, though they had known each other for a few years, Anthony said.

She said the radio’s executive board had been talking about radio stunts to gain attention for the station, and she thought it would be fun to attempt to break the record together.

"A lot of campus doesn’t really know that we exist, so we were looking to get more publicity," Kaminski said.

So when Anthony came across the "stunt," the two students figured they might as well try, Kaminski said.

They were planning to come up with a list of topics and interview people they could bring into the studio, but "it just really snuck up on us," she said.

The time they needed to beat was set in February 2016 in Jordan: 60 hours, 52 minutes and eight seconds.

Anthony and Kaminiski came in at 66 hours, 45 minutes and 59 seconds, which they completed from 10:08 a.m. March 17 to 5 a.m. March 20.

They had to talk nearly the entire time since one of the rules was there couldn’t be more than 10 seconds of silence. Any guests they brought on could only speak for a minute at a time.

The trek through that much time with very limited sleep involved Kaminski drinking more than a gallon of chocolate milk in the first 48 hours and the two students playing card games and board games aloud, as well as a lot of talk about life on campus.

Kaminski said that as a college student, she’s not used to getting "large amounts" of sleep, but she was concerned about Anthony, who had never "pulled an all-nighter."

Anthony said she wasn’t sure, even during the attempt, that she could make it through the record.

She compared the moments before unofficially breaking the record to the anticipation and excitement of waiting for the ball to drop on New Year’s Eve.

"And then afterwards, it was definitely, for me at least, it was an adrenaline rush almost," Anthony said. "And I felt like we should just keep going as long as we could since we already broke the record, so why not go, you know, as far and as long as we were able to."

Red Arrow Tap Room at 111 E. First St. in Elmhurst brought the students salads, sandwiches and macaroni and cheese, and the students were surprised with desserts as well.

There also was a "constant stream of snacks," Anthony said.

When the marathon trip around the clock was over, Kaminski drove back to her apartment, took a shower and went to sleep.

Now it’s a wait for the Guinness Book of World Records team to get back to them about their feat. Guinness must review the evidence the students submitted and determine whether they are the new official title holders.

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April 2, 2018 at 10:34AM

Elmhurst College students unofficially break talk show world record

SIUC Faculty Senate president: Rumored low freshman enrollment numbers inaccurate

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CARBONDALE — The president of Southern Illinois University Carbondale’s Faculty Senate says a rumor about next year’s anticipated freshman enrollment is inaccurate.

At a Graduate and Professional Student Council meeting on March 6, GPSC President Johnathan Flowers announced that university projections place fall 2018 freshman enrollment between 870 and 970 students. The decline would leave a $4 million hole in the university’s budget, Flowers claimed.

In a phone interview with The Southern late last week, Flowers said the information came from a Faculty Senate Executive Committee meeting with the chancellor.

“I have it on good authority from people in that meeting … that this is straight from the chancellor’s mouth and it was co-signed by Associate Provost (David) DiLalla,” Flowers said.

The Faculty Senate Executive Council consists of the body’s four officers, its past president and five chairs.

Reached Monday, Faculty Senate President Kathie Chwalisz, professor of psychology, said the figures cited by Flowers comprise one of several estimates provided at the Executive Council meeting.

“We did get some preliminary numbers, but they also were just estimates, and there were estimates that were much larger, too. So that number was a conservative number, but I don’t think it’s anything official,” Chwalisz said.

The estimates were provided by the university’s enrollment management office and are partially based on housing contracts. The university does not currently have a director in that office, Chwalisz noted.

“Anybody who’s making those estimates is just making those estimates based on their piece of the puzzle, but right now we don’t have anybody who, that’s their career,” she said.

Freshman enrollment in fall 2017 was 2,126, a decline of 19.19 percent compared to the fall of 2016. The chancellor has publicly stated that fall 2018 enrollment could sink below 1,000.

“(The 870-970 estimate) is an alarming estimate and it’s a sad estimate, but I think some of the other people in that office had estimated 1,100 or 1,200,” Chwalisz said.

Chwalisz also denied Flowers’ claims that deans have been asked to prepare 2, 4 and 6 percent reductions to their areas. She said the chancellor reported at the Executive Council meeting that he hasn’t asked anyone to prepare for budget cuts.

“The fact that any report would come out of that meeting is a little strange, and that the authority would be Johnathan Flowers and the GPSC,” Chwalisz said.

Rae Goldsmith, SIU’s chief marketing and communications officer, said in an email that the university had “nothing to share” on projected freshman enrollment.

The next full Faculty Senate meeting will be held March 20.






janis.esch@thesouthern.com

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On Twitter: @janis_eschSI



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March 12, 2018 at 04:45PM

SIUC Faculty Senate president: Rumored low freshman enrollment numbers inaccurate

SIUC Faculty Senate president: Rumored low freshman enrollment numbers inaccurate

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CARBONDALE — The president of Southern Illinois University Carbondale’s Faculty Senate says a rumor about next year’s anticipated freshman enrollment is inaccurate.

At a Graduate and Professional Student Council meeting on March 6, GPSC President Johnathan Flowers announced that university projections place fall 2018 freshman enrollment between 870 and 970 students. The decline would leave a $4 million hole in the university’s budget, Flowers claimed.

In a phone interview with The Southern late last week, Flowers said the information came from a Faculty Senate Executive Committee meeting with the chancellor.

“I have it on good authority from people in that meeting … that this is straight from the chancellor’s mouth and it was co-signed by Associate Provost (David) DiLalla,” Flowers said.

The Faculty Senate Executive Council consists of the body’s four officers, its past president and five chairs.

Reached Monday, Faculty Senate President Kathie Chwalisz, professor of psychology, said the figures cited by Flowers comprise one of several estimates provided at the Executive Council meeting.

“We did get some preliminary numbers, but they also were just estimates, and there were estimates that were much larger, too. So that number was a conservative number, but I don’t think it’s anything official,” Chwalisz said.

The estimates were provided by the university’s enrollment management office and are partially based on housing contracts. The university does not currently have a director in that office, Chwalisz noted.

“Anybody who’s making those estimates is just making those estimates based on their piece of the puzzle, but right now we don’t have anybody who, that’s their career,” she said.

Freshman enrollment in fall 2017 was 2,126, a decline of 19.19 percent compared to the fall of 2016. The chancellor has publicly stated that fall 2018 enrollment could sink below 1,000.

“(The 870-970 estimate) is an alarming estimate and it’s a sad estimate, but I think some of the other people in that office had estimated 1,100 or 1,200,” Chwalisz said.

Chwalisz also denied Flowers’ claims that deans have been asked to prepare 2, 4 and 6 percent reductions to their areas. She said the chancellor reported at the Executive Council meeting that he hasn’t asked anyone to prepare for budget cuts.

“The fact that any report would come out of that meeting is a little strange, and that the authority would be Johnathan Flowers and the GPSC,” Chwalisz said.

Rae Goldsmith, SIU’s chief marketing and communications officer, said in an email that the university had “nothing to share” on projected freshman enrollment.

The next full Faculty Senate meeting will be held March 20.






janis.esch@thesouthern.com

618-351-5082

On Twitter: @janis_eschSI



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March 12, 2018 at 04:45PM

SIUC Faculty Senate president: Rumored low freshman enrollment numbers inaccurate

SIUC Faculty Senate president: Rumored low freshman enrollment numbers inaccurate

http://ift.tt/2IjWnAi



CARBONDALE — The president of Southern Illinois University Carbondale’s Faculty Senate says a rumor about next year’s anticipated freshman enrollment is inaccurate.

At a Graduate and Professional Student Council meeting on March 6, GPSC President Johnathan Flowers announced that university projections place fall 2018 freshman enrollment between 870 and 970 students. The decline would leave a $4 million hole in the university’s budget, Flowers claimed.

In a phone interview with The Southern late last week, Flowers said the information came from a Faculty Senate Executive Committee meeting with the chancellor.

“I have it on good authority from people in that meeting … that this is straight from the chancellor’s mouth and it was co-signed by Associate Provost (David) DiLalla,” Flowers said.

The Faculty Senate Executive Council consists of the body’s four officers, its past president and five chairs.

Reached Monday, Faculty Senate President Kathie Chwalisz, professor of psychology, said the figures cited by Flowers comprise one of several estimates provided at the Executive Council meeting.

“We did get some preliminary numbers, but they also were just estimates, and there were estimates that were much larger, too. So that number was a conservative number, but I don’t think it’s anything official,” Chwalisz said.

The estimates were provided by the university’s enrollment management office and are partially based on housing contracts. The university does not currently have a director in that office, Chwalisz noted.

“Anybody who’s making those estimates is just making those estimates based on their piece of the puzzle, but right now we don’t have anybody who, that’s their career,” she said.

Freshman enrollment in fall 2017 was 2,126, a decline of 19.19 percent compared to the fall of 2016. The chancellor has publicly stated that fall 2018 enrollment could sink below 1,000.

“(The 870-970 estimate) is an alarming estimate and it’s a sad estimate, but I think some of the other people in that office had estimated 1,100 or 1,200,” Chwalisz said.

Chwalisz also denied Flowers’ claims that deans have been asked to prepare 2, 4 and 6 percent reductions to their areas. She said the chancellor reported at the Executive Council meeting that he hasn’t asked anyone to prepare for budget cuts.

“The fact that any report would come out of that meeting is a little strange, and that the authority would be Johnathan Flowers and the GPSC,” Chwalisz said.

Rae Goldsmith, SIU’s chief marketing and communications officer, said in an email that the university had “nothing to share” on projected freshman enrollment.

The next full Faculty Senate meeting will be held March 20.






janis.esch@thesouthern.com

618-351-5082

On Twitter: @janis_eschSI



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March 12, 2018 at 04:45PM

SIUC Faculty Senate president: Rumored low freshman enrollment numbers inaccurate

Medill sees 24 percent increase in undergraduate applications

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The Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications received about 24 percent more undergraduate journalism applications for the 2018-19 school year than from the year before, said Jon Yates, the University’s director of media relations, in an email to The Daily.

University President Morton Schapiro said he was excited to hear about the increase and that he hopes the trend continues.

“Journalism is … such an important part of the legacy, the future of Northwestern,” Schapiro told The Daily on Thursday. “We have a lot of jewels in the crown, and one of them is Medill.”

Medill assistant dean Beth Bennett told The Daily in an email that Medill is “pleased” to see an increase in applications and is “excited to welcome the class of 2022.”

“Medill is the only journalism school at a top-15 university,” Bennett said. “And the programs we offer — including Journalism Residency, chances to study in San Francisco and Washington, D.C., and many opportunities to travel and report from abroad — give our students the experiences that lead to successful careers in journalism, media, marketing and beyond.”

Medill Prof. emeritus Roger Boye told The Daily there could be a combination of reasons for the jump, such as increased marketing and the rise of Northwestern in national rankings.

Boye directs the Medill-Northwestern Journalism Institute, a program through which rising high school seniors can come to Medill and study journalism over the summer. He said he noticed a shift in tone with last year’s applicants to the program, who would now be seniors and may have applied to Medill.

“Last March, as I was reading Cherub applications, a number of the Cherub applicants talked about the media being the enemy and so forth,” Boye told The Daily, referring to the program. “The kinds of things that we hear from Washington. And they said that has increased their desire to study journalism, that they want to help defend democracy.”

President Donald Trump — who has made many negative comments about the media — was two months into his presidency last year at this time, Boye pointed out.

One of last year’s applicants said people “scream” fake news about news organizations and that she “felt obliged to clear (journalism’s) name.” Other applicants said they want to ensure accountability and report the truth.

“I am armed with a pen, paper and computer,” one application obtained by The Daily said, “ready to join the battle between harsh legitimacy and cushioned lies, regardless of whether I become the good guy or the bad guy.”

Email: alexiswhite2021@u.northwestern.edu
Twitter: @AlexisFWhite

The post Medill sees 24 percent increase in undergraduate applications appeared first on The Daily Northwestern.

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March 8, 2018 at 10:27PM

Medill sees 24 percent increase in undergraduate applications